Friday, May 29, 2009

“PDKats” EVENT FEEDS THE LIONS AND TIGERS AT BIG CAT RESCUE

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE              CONTACT:     Bonnie Kirstein
558-5300 ext. 230

"PDKats" EVENT FEEDS THE LIONS AND TIGERS AT BIG CAT RESCUE AND THE MINDS OF HILLSBOROUGH STUDENTS

Tampa, FL (May 27, 2009) – The Tampa Chapter of Phi Delta Kappa (PDK), the premier professional association for educators, in concert with the Hillsborough County School District, recently completed their first fundraising contest event for students called "PDKats." 

According to Dr. Jacquelyn Masters, Principal of Seminole Elementary School and President of PDK, the program has two goals:  "The first goal is to enhance the interest of the students in learning about wild animals and foster their compassion for these magnificent creatures by having them feel the personal satisfaction of raising funds to feed these rescued big cats. The second is to support a wonderful area nonprofit organization that has, for many years, provided our students with a totally unique educational experience."

The month long contest, held in April, was open to all of the schools in Hillsborough County and was chaired by Bonnie Kirstein of Davidsen Middle School and co-chaired by Katey Runey of Farnell Middle School.  The goal for each school was to raise $250, the approximate cost of feeding the lions and tigers at Big Cat Rescue for one day. At the final tally a total of $3,783.95 has been donated, which is equivalent to the cost of feeding one tiger or lion for one full year!

Each class that achieved the goal will be recognized on a sign outside Big Cat Rescue's Trading Post for one year.  In addition to this special recognition, the students of the class raising the most money to feed the cats will receive free tour passes to the sanctuary. Big Cat Rescue will also film a special podcast of the winning students to post on the sanctuary's YouTube channel, which is currently the 7th most watched non-profit channel.  The Teacher of the winning class and the Principal and Area Director of that school, as a reward for their efforts in promoting this educational experience, each receive a 3 day weekend in a Jaguar XF provided by Jaguar of Tampa and a 3 day/2 night stay for two on St. Pete Beach at the Sirata Beach Resort.  Both corporate sponsors are long time supporters of Big Cat Rescue.

The winning teacher was David Nelson from the PE Department at Davidsen Middle School, whose class raised $1,400.  Brent McBrien, Principal of Davidsen, and Area 2 Director, Jerry Jackson were the other winners, but Mr. Jackson opted to defer his prizes to one of his other teachers, who he felt did the footwork in this effort, Ms. Jani Rouse at Lomax Elementary.

"Education is a critical element of our mission at Big Cat Rescue," said Education Director Beth Kamhi.  "On the over 70 school field trips to the sanctuary each year, students benefit by learning scientific facts that are made more meaningful and memorable by the feelings evoked when actually meeting these magnificent animals in person.  There is compelling evidence that learning compassion for animals as a child translates into compassion for people as an adult, and this opportunity for affective learning is extraordinary.  As students participate in donating to feed the animals, the PDKats program adds a dimension of direct involvement and pride, enriching the educational experience and emotional connection.  We are thrilled about this exciting collaboration with PDK and enhancement of our long time partnership with the Hillsborough County School District! We would like to offer our profound appreciation to Bonnie Kirstein for all her hard work coordinating this event, and to PDK and the Hillsborough students, teachers and staff."

About PDK

PDK, the premier professional association for educators, was founded in 1906 and today has chapters across the United States and abroad. The association strives for educational excellence through a wide range of innovative initiatives.  These include providing educators with information about current issues to promote dialog about which policies, ideology and methods to adopt.  PDK also works to connect members with the community and the school district through service projects and networking opportunities. The local chapter has participated in "Paint your heart out Tampa Bay," "Toys for Students" (a home grown project with the district's social workers to make sure all children have a gift for the holidays), and now the PDKats Program.  For further information on PDK visit www.pdkintl.org.

About Big Cat Rescue

Big Cat Rescue, a non-profit organization, provides a permanent home for abandoned, abused and orphaned exotic cats. Over 100 lions, tigers, leopards, bobcats and more reside at the astonishing 45 acre Citrus Park refuge, making it one of the largest sanctuaries in the world devoted to big cats.  Big Cat Rescue is located at 12802 Easy Street, across the street from the mall at Citrus Park. For further information on the sanctuary, please visit www.BigCatRescue.org, call 813.920.4130 or send an email inquiry to Info@BigCatRescue.org. 





For the cats,

Carole Baskin, CEO of Big Cat Rescue
an Educational Sanctuary home
to more than 100 big cats
12802 Easy Street Tampa, FL  33625
813.493.4564 fax 885.4457

http://www.BigCatRescue.org


Sign our petition to protect tigers from being farmed here:

http://capwiz.com/bigcatrescue/issues/alert/?alertid=9952801&type=CU

Free ways to join us and help the big cats:

Twitter:  Follow Me and be invited to enter our Animal Lover's Dream Vacation Giveaway!  http://twitter.com/BigCatRescue

This message contains information from Big Cat Rescue that may be confidential or privileged. The information contained herein is intended
only for the eyes of the individual or entity named above.  You are hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution, disclosure, and/or copying of the information contained in this communication is strictly prohibited. The recipient should check this e-mail and any attachments for the presence of viruses. Big Cat Rescue accepts no liability for any damage or loss caused by any virus transmitted by this e-mail.




Thursday, May 14, 2009

Tiger Bone Wine and Medicines

Source: Open source

Date: 04/24/09

Author: Elise Woods 

Recently, WWF Traffic released a publication called Paper Tigers? The role of the US Captive Tiger Population in the Trade in Tiger Parts.pdf (1) which calls for better regulatory overview of the tiger population in the United States.  Today, the two largest single populations of tigers are now those that reside in captivity in China and the United States (2).  Ongoing black market demand has relegated the tiger to a black market status of worth more dead than alive.  Much of this black market enters the U.S. and Canada in the form of Traditional Asian Medicines (TAM) or Traditional Chinese Medicines (TCM).  CBP Agriculture Specialists and CBP Officers are the very tip of the point for recognizing, regulating and whenever possible, referring relevant medicines to US Fish and Wildlife Officials for legal enforcement.  Every good seizure of prohibited medicine gives us another bread crumb of information leading to the tangled world of illegal wildlife trade, industrial level pharmaceutical manufacturers, tiger /bear farms and international shipping, all of which hide the dirt under the cover of legitimate trade.  With that in mind, allow me to share what I have learned so far. 

1.  Federal officials have found several tiger medicines this year. 

A.  Leopard Bone, Musk and Ephedra Plaster Bandage. 

One of the most recent is a Chinese Patent medicine manufactured by ZHEJIANG DINGTAI PHARMACEUTICAL CO., LTD, a "one of the leading manufacturing enterprises for medical dressing materials (bandages, gauze etc) in China according to their website: http://www.zjdingtai.com".  Not surprisingly, one of their most interesting products is not listed on their website, and well it should not be as it contains two CITES listed ingredients and a banned FDA ingredient. Z33020963 is the patent trade number for this specific medicine from this specific company. Note: So far, all the Chinese Patents found have contained a similar style number that starts with "Z". 

Shexiang Zhuanggu Gao   Z33020963, Leopard Bone, Musk, Ephedra,                           

麝香 (Musk) 、豹骨 (Leopard bone) 、麻黄 (Ephedra    

Your browser may not support display of this image.   Your browser may not support display of this image.«"Z" number will be found on the lower half of label. 
 

B. Another brand of Shexiangzhuanggu Gao plasters Z42021305? 

These (1 and 2) were found in exams this week while the last label with the obvious tiger picture is listed in an online advertisement for the same trade name and number.  They are all the same medicated plasters from the same company:  HUANGSHI HYGIENIC MATERIAL PHARMACEUTICAL CO., LTD (http://www.hsssh.com).  All three boxes are labeled for the same patent product although the pictures are different.  In English on the box label it states the musk is artificial, and no bone is mentioned outside of the online advertisement translations*. The medicine does contain regulated ingredients such as Adeps Lanae (Hydrous Wool Fat), Ephedra and Chondroitin Sulfate for certain, along with several other herbs on which research is ongoing.  We will need better determination as to the musk ingredient and possible bone products including tiger or leopard for future Fish and Wildlife Enforcement opportunities. The online business Chinese advertisement translates via Bablefish into the following:   

    *"Medicinal extract brand Shen Nong the tiger specification 6.5*10*6 ingredient musk strong bone paste extracts… Uses the Shennongjia natural typical traditional Chinese medicine, the curative effect is good, turning head rate is high; Original musk tiger bone paste improvement product; Yunnan natural high quality rubber; The technique of production changes the advanced beating law by the dry pressing… 4th, domestic only through American FDA registration Chinese medicinal plaster (registration number 3003980579); 5th, obtains the Chinese international monopoly and the name brand exposition gold medal. " (Note: For what it is worth, Google search for Shennongjia includes the Shennongjia Nature Reserve which does house some species of protected felids).  
     

Shexiangzhuanggu Gao Z42021305 ,   
 

Your browser may not support display of this image.          Your browser may not support display of this image.   Your browser may not support display of this image.            Your browser may not support display of this image.    

  
 
 
 

C. Well known tiger bone pill.   

Bug symbol might be different (seen also with butterfly).  Compare to pictures on page Traditional Asian Medicine Identification Guide for Law Enforcers- version II (pg. 2.9 #B) . Note: tiger bone character (虎骨) is on ingredient label, chicken symbol on front (H5N1 disease risk) and also contains Deer antler (Anthrax, FMD disease risk), both of which also appear on the ingredient list in Traditional Chinese characters.  Gel capsule content inspection will show bone bits under microscope. 

Your browser may not support display of this image.  Your browser may not support display of this image.  Your browser may not support display of this image.

Box                                                             Bottle and pills               Tiger gel cap contents           
 

D. Vietnamese Little Tiger Medication.  

According to PAX this had tiger and monkey bone. Note the Black Cat Picture and the word "Cao" which is Vietnamese (vn) word which means "jelly" when associated with TAM.  In this case it is referring to animal jelly made by boiling desired animal part (usually bone or Cao xương (Vn)-bone jelly).  

Your browser may not support display of this image. 
 
 

2.  Canadians win one against tiger bone medicine trader.   

I recently contacted a Federal Wildlife Officer for Environment Canada Wildlife Enforcement Division to request pictures and information regarding their recent successful case against Wing Quon Enterprises Ltd., for possessing and attempting to sell medicines containing parts from Tigers and other protected species.  Thanks to the recent change in CITES, they were able to make the case on labeling alone.  They seized up to 1200 bottles of the endangered plant medication, 200 of one of the bear meds and 50 for each of the tiger meds.  1200 bottles were labeled as was being imported, the rest found in the warehouse either being sold or found during their warrant. Pictures of seizure are found in Attachment A.  They have also been instrumental in helping build information on known TAM issues and identification guides. 
 
    

3. Other important translations from TAM labels and research: Hu, Gu, hổ

Note: Look for Bone symbol "" and THEN for tiger or leopard or other animal symbol!

báo (Vn) panther
Cao xương (Vn) bone jelly
con cọp (Vn) tiger
hãc lão hổ (Vn) "black Tiger"-may be radix dipsaci plant if 黑老虎   also present
hēi lǎo (Ch-Pinyin) black tiger
hổ (Vn) tiger
(Ch) tiger
Hu Gu (Os Tigris) (Ch) Tiger Bones.
Hu Gu Jiu (Ch. Recipe) Medicated Wine with Tiger Bone,Secretio Moschus,Cornu Cervi,
Hu Qian Wan (1/2) (Ch. Recipe) Hidden Tiger Pill;
huāng;  (Vn or Ch) blood
huyết (vn) blood
lǎo tiger
Os (latin) os, ossis: Latin os = bone; plural - ossa,
Panthera Large cats
Panthera leo Lion
Panthera pardus Leopard
Panthera tigris Tiger
Shen Rong Hu Gu Wan Ginseng, Deer Antler and Tiger Bone Pill; Ginseng-Cornu Cervi-Os Tigris Pill
Tiger bone 虎骨
Leopard bone 豹骨
大猫 Big Cat (Chinese)
Lion
Panthera leo
老虎 lǎo , tiger
; tiger
Panthera tigris
虎骨 Tiger bone
豹骨 Leopard bone
bone (looks like a person)
 
 
 
 

4.  H5N1 tigers from Sri Racha Tiger Zoo 

Has anyone seen this heartwarming e-mail asking can't we just get along like the tiger and pigs in this picture? 

Your browser may not support display of this image.

*http://www.snopes.com/photos/animals/tigerpig.asp 

I received this from a friend recently and thought this picture looked familiar.  According to Snopes.com, the cute tiger-pigs were actually taken* at Sri Racha Tiger Zoo in Thailand.  This zoo also has or had the Sri Racha Traditional Health Clinic on site and were caught selling tiger bone pills a few years ago (3).  According to a contact with Zoological Society of London/and International Tiger Coalition (ITC) associate, the difference between zoos and farms boils down to management:  

    "Zoos keep tigers in natural social groups (alone, a pair, a mother with cubs or possibly a pair with cubs) and practice "conservation breeding" in which the goal is maximum retention of genetic diversity and strategies include avoidance of inbreeding, equalisation of founder representation and lengthening of interbirth interval (slower breeding).  Tiger farms, in contrast, are aiming for  maximum production of product in terms of bones (and also of tourist revenues as a side benefit).  The management strategy necessary for maximum production of tiger bones is parallel to that used in intensive farming of any domestic animal - fixing desirable traits through inbreeding, rapidly selecting for stock that does well in the unnatural conditions,  producing as many animals as possible in any given time period, and then housing them all together to save on enclosure costs until they are full sized and can be harvested.  "Farming" in this manner results in rapid and large-scale loss of genetic diversity, in direct contrast to conservation breeding as practised by zoos (4). 
     

There exists a lot of controversy with this particular zoo. 

Another concern to USDA and  CBP  is the susceptibility of tigers to High Pathogenic (HP) H5N1 avian influenza (AI) which has been proven to be  linked to illegal trade and transport of infected poultry or exotic birds.  In 2003, H5N1 in big cats was first documented in a Suphanburi, Thailand zoo where two leopards and two tigers died (5).    

Then, in, 2004, there was a H5N1 bird flu outbreak which affected the tigers at Sri Racha Tiger Zoo as confirmed by the National Institute of Animal Health laboratory (6). 

At Sri Racha, 147 tigers out of 441 total population died of infection or were euthanized which meant that, as documented, approximately 31%  (45 tigers) of the cull were sick tigers, and approximately 69% (102) were culled to control the spread of the disease (6) (9). Note: OIE Follow-up report numbers used as final count. 

Standard disease eradication procedures are to dispose of the bodies of the culled animals in a way that eradicates the viral, bacterial or spore disease risk.  Previous studies indicated that implementation of control (including disposition of dead animals) is difficult in Thailand (7).  News reports at the time raised an alarming issue regarding the disposal of the sick and euthanized tigers.

    "Conservationists were alarmed that the dead tigers were not incinerated after their lung tissue samples tested positive for bird flu. Viruses tend to persist and re-infect, and the temptation for profiteers to dig up the valuable skins or tiger bones and smuggle them abroad puts black-market customers at risk as a result.  Steven Galster, the director of the conservation group, WildAid, called for a transparent investigation into the tiger mercy killings and wants carcass disposal to be supervised. "Whatever is really happening at Sri Racha, more tigers and people are potentially at threat," he said."(8)

Strikingly, there is no information on the disposition of the affected tiger carcasses in this study, nor in the follow-up reports issued to the World Organization for Animal Health Website-OIE (9).  I contacted an ASEAN source to ask if he had any up-to-date information on where and how the affected animals were disposed of.  According to the e-mail I received, He does have eye-witness testimony and there are photographs available (although not in his possession) of the tiger burial into a cement container and unknown chemicals were poured over the carcasses prior to being buried (10). 

In absence of incineration and given the potential for the burial site to be a "stockpile" of sorts, we should factor in the possibility of "bird flu tigers" in the tiger bone medicine black market as an additional disease risk factor in Traditional Asian Medicine (TAM) or Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). 
 

5.  Is it too late? 

Is there still time or is it too late for tigers? 

CBP is actively enforcing US laws against trade in tiger parts and derivatives and by learning to identify these parts and derivatives in Traditional Asian Medications we will effectively limit much of the above ground trade that we encounter every day in ports in the US.  By applying the USDA regulations on regulated animal products such as bone, blood, antler, chicken, cow etc, CBP Agriculture Specialists can shut off the flow valve of endangered and/or disease risk components that enter this country every day via the pathway of TAM. 

Moreover, in learning to identify what we are dealing with, and in working with other agencies such as Fish and Wildlife, USDA SITC, we can help to lay the groundwork for effective legal action against the middle men and end-point distributors.   

As for the tigers, all is not lost. Much is being done by World Wildlife Foundation , ASEAN-WEN,  and various Non Governmental Organizations (NGO) and wildlife agencies to reeducate, reemploy and find other sources of income for those often found at the beginning of the tiger trade chain-those living at subsistence level.  Much has been done through WWF Traffic to capture enforcement data and provides educational resources for law enforcement agencies on a global level. 

Studies by Luo et al, measured the genetic variability of the worldwide captive tigers to assess whether they can be used to save the tiger species from extinction. (11). The results speak for themselves:  

    "Tigers (Panthera tigris) are disappearing rapidly from the wild, from over 100,000 in the 1900s to as few as 3000 [Javan (P.t. sondaica), Bali (P.t. balica), and Caspian (P.t. virgata) subspecies are extinct, whereas the South China tiger (P.t. amoyensis) persists only in zoos.  By contrast, captive tigers are flourishing, with 15,000–20,000 individuals worldwide, outnumbering their wild relatives five to seven times. As of 2007, there are approximately 421 Amur (P.t. altaica), 295 Sumatran (P.t. sumatrae), 72 South China (P.t. amoyensis), 198 Bengal (P.t. tigris), 14 Indochinese (P.t. corbetti), and 113 Malayan (P.t. jacksoni) tigers in captivity as recorded in regional and international zoo studbooks . The tested captive tigers retain appreciable genomic diversity unobserved in their wild counterparts, perhaps a consequence of large population size, century long introduction of new founders, and managed-breeding strategies to retain genetic variability." (11) 
     

Perhaps a quote by Dr. Ullas Karnath, a University of Florida alumni that has spent the past 20 years in India working for the Wildlife Conservation Society. 

    "A century from now there could be 30,000 to 40,000 tigers in India alone.  The real question is whether we can muster up the political will and raise the level of protection to make sure that this happens".  (12) 
     
     
     

Animals are not brethren, they are not underlings; They are other nations, caught with ourselves in the net of life and time. 
Henry Beston, American Author, also known as "The Vagabond of the Dunes" (1888-1968)
 
 
 
 
 

References: 

  1. Paper Tigers? The role of the US Captive Tiger Population in the Trade in Tiger Parts.pdf
 
  1. Ibid.
 
  1. Black Market-Global Syndicates Profit From a New Contraband; Inside the    Endangered Species Trade in Asia. Ben Davies and Jane Goodall. Publisher: Earth Aware Editions ISBN-13: 9781932771220 ISBN: 1932771220.
 
  1. Personal email with Sarah Christie, Carnivore Programme Manager, Zoological Society of London/International Tiger Coalition.
 
  1. Keawcharoen, Juthatip et al., 2004. Avian Influenza H5N1 in Tigers and Leopards. Emerging Infectious Diseases • www.cdc.gov/eid • Vol. 10, No. 12, December 2004
 
  1. Thanawongnuwech, Roongroje et al., 2005. Probable Tiger-to-Tiger Transmission of Avian Influenza H5N1. Emerging Infectious Diseases • www.cdc.gov/eid • Vol. 11, No. 5, May 2005
 
  1. Yee, Karen., Tim Carpenter and C. Cardona. 2008.  Epidemiology of H5N1 avian influenza * Comparative Immunology, Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, In Press, Corrected Proof, Available online 29 April 2008.
 
  1. McGirk, Jan.  The Temple of The Tigers. The Independent, Nov 4, 2004
 
  1. World Organization for Animal Health Website. 2004 Thailand H5N1 year end report.
 
  1. Personal email with ASEAN source who prefers to remain anonymous at this time.
 
  1. Luo, Shu-Jin et al., 2008.  Report-Subspecies Genetic Assignments of Worldwide Captive Tigers Increase Conservation Value of Captive Populations. Current Biology 18, 592–596, April 22, 2008.
 
  1. Black Market-Global Syndicates Profit From a New Contraband; Inside the Endangered Species Trade in Asia. Ben Davies. Pg  126
 
 

Attachments 

      1. Wing Quan Canadian Sucessful Prosecution.pdf  Pictures of seized products
 
      1. Luo, Shu-Lin et al., 2008. Report-Subspecies Genetic Assignments of Worldwide Captive Tigers Increase Conservation Value of Captive Populations.
 
      1. Keawcharoen, Juthatip et al., 2004. Avian Influenza H5N1 in Tigers and Leopards. Emerging Infectious Diseases • www.cdc.gov/eid • Vol. 10, No. 12, December 2004
 
      1. Thanawongnuwech, Roongroje et al., 2005. Probable Tiger-to-Tiger Transmission of Avian Influenza H5N1. Emerging Infectious Diseases • www.cdc.gov/eid • Vol. 11, No. 5, May 2005


--
For the cats,

Carole Baskin, CEO of Big Cat Rescue
an Educational Sanctuary home
to more than 100 big cats
12802 Easy Street Tampa, FL  33625
813.493.4564 fax 885.4457

http://www.BigCatRescue.org


Sign our petition to protect tigers from being farmed here:

http://capwiz.com/bigcatrescue/issues/alert/?alertid=9952801&type=CU

Free ways to join us and help the big cats:

Twitter:  Follow Me and be invited to enter our Animal Lover's Dream Vacation Giveaway!  http://twitter.com/BigCatRescue

This message contains information from Big Cat Rescue that may be confidential or privileged. The information contained herein is intended
only for the eyes of the individual or entity named above.  You are hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution, disclosure, and/or copying of the information contained in this communication is strictly prohibited. The recipient should check this e-mail and any attachments for the presence of viruses. Big Cat Rescue accepts no liability for any damage or loss caused by any virus transmitted by this e-mail.




Feds seize lion, tiger, ivory from yacht

Feds seize lion, tiger, ivory from yacht

Associated Press

13 May 2009

 

MIAMI (AP) - Federal authorities say they seized 29 illegal wildlife items from a yacht in Miami including tiger, lion, zebra skins and elephant ivory.

The items were taken from the yacht "Mystere" as part of a prosecution under the Endangered Species Act and other laws. The corporate yacht owner - Ruzial Limited - pled guilty earlier this month and paid 150 thousand dollars.

The seized items will be used in efforts to educate the public about illegal wildlife trafficking. US Attorney Alex Acosta says poachers continue to kill protected animals because there is a strong market demand. Officials put the value of the contraband at over 85 thousand dollars.

 

http://www.wrcbtv.com/Global/story.asp?S=10359342



--
For the cats,

Carole Baskin, CEO of Big Cat Rescue
an Educational Sanctuary home
to more than 100 big cats
12802 Easy Street Tampa, FL  33625
813.493.4564 fax 885.4457

http://www.BigCatRescue.org


Sign our petition to protect tigers from being farmed here:

http://capwiz.com/bigcatrescue/issues/alert/?alertid=9952801&type=CU

Free ways to join us and help the big cats:

Twitter:  Follow Me and be invited to enter our Animal Lover's Dream Vacation Giveaway!  http://twitter.com/BigCatRescue

This message contains information from Big Cat Rescue that may be confidential or privileged. The information contained herein is intended
only for the eyes of the individual or entity named above.  You are hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution, disclosure, and/or copying of the information contained in this communication is strictly prohibited. The recipient should check this e-mail and any attachments for the presence of viruses. Big Cat Rescue accepts no liability for any damage or loss caused by any virus transmitted by this e-mail.




Saturday, May 09, 2009

Machester MI Bans Exotic Pets

A recent case of an alligator being kept at a local residence prompted
safety concerns from many people in the Manchester community.
At its April 20 meeting, the Manchester Village Council took a step in
alleviating fears by adopting a new ordinance regarding exotic and wild pets.
Village Ordinance 272, which bans the owning or keeping of exotic animals
in the community, was passed unanimously.

The ordinance will go into effect in late May around the Memorial Day
weekend.

At the council's April 6 meeting, village residents expressed concern about
an alligator being kept at a residence on City Road.

"The main concern was the health and safety of the people in the
community," Village Manager Jeff Wallace said. "There was nothing in our
ordinances

regarding the issue, so when the police and Humane Society came there was
nothing they could do about it."

During that meeting, members of the council reviewed four exotic pet
ordinances from different communities and agreed that an ordinance against
exotic pets be implemented in Manchester.

The ordinance reads that no person, corporation or organization can house
or maintain any exotic or wild animal within the Village of Manchester. A
person who owns or keeps such an animal on the effective date of the
ordinance must remove it from the village within 30 days.

The ordinance defines "exotic or wild animals" as those not occurring
naturally in the state. Among the animals listed were alligators, antelope,
badgers, bats, beaver, bears, bisons, bobcats, camels, cheetahs, chipmunks,
constriction snakes, cougars, coyotes, crocodiles, crows, deer, ducks,
elephants, elk, fox, gamecocks (or other fighting birds), geese, goats, gophers,
groundhogs, hippopotami, hyenas, jaguars, lions, leopards, llamas, lynx,
mink, moles, moose, muskrats, opossums, otters, ostriches, owls, panthers,
peacocks, pheasants, piranha fish, porcupines, primates, apes, chimpanzees,
gibbons, gorillas, orangutans, siamangs, baboons, pigs, wild pigs, pumas,
mountain lions, quail, raccoons, reptiles, rhinoceroses, seals, sharks,
skunks, poisonous snakes, snow leopards, poisonous spiders, squirrels, tigers,
whales wild rabbits, wild turkeys, wolf-dog crosses, wolverines, wolves,
zebras and any other traditional farm animals.

"If you allow someone to keep an alligator in their homes and do nothing
about it, how far can people go?" Wallace said. "That's why we tried to make
it as specific as possible."

The general penalties for violation of the ordinance could include up to a
$1,000 fine and possible 90 days in jail. Each violation is considered a
separate offense.

For more information on the exotic pet ordinance, visit the Village of
Manchester's Web site at _www.vil-manchester.org_
(http://www.vil-manchester.org/) .

Staff Writer Ed Patino can be reached at 428-8173 or _epatino@..._
(mailto:epatino@...) .

Click here to return to story:

http://www.manchesterenterprise.com/stories/050709/loc_20090507009.shtml


--
For the cats,

Carole Baskin, CEO of Big Cat Rescue
an Educational Sanctuary home
to more than 100 big cats
12802 Easy Street Tampa, FL  33625
813.493.4564 fax 885.4457

http://www.BigCatRescue.org


Sign our petition to protect tigers from being farmed here:

http://capwiz.com/bigcatrescue/issues/alert/?alertid=9952801&type=CU

Free ways to join us and help the big cats:

Twitter:  Follow Me and be invited to enter our Animal Lover's Dream Vacation Giveaway!  http://twitter.com/BigCatRescue

This message contains information from Big Cat Rescue that may be confidential or privileged. The information contained herein is intended
only for the eyes of the individual or entity named above.  You are hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution, disclosure, and/or copying of the information contained in this communication is strictly prohibited. The recipient should check this e-mail and any attachments for the presence of viruses. Big Cat Rescue accepts no liability for any damage or loss caused by any virus transmitted by this e-mail.




Forever Wild must pave road to open

Forever Wild must pave road to open

Wednesday, May 06, 2009

By Bob Banfield

From tigers to reptiles, cougars and leopards, The Forever Wild Sanctuary
is the last stop for many exotic animals. But the facility in Phelan can't
open its doors. San Bernardino County officials say the sanctuary must pave
the dirt road leading to the sanctuary, at a cost of about $1 million.

Twenty-four big cats, tigers, lions, 60 reptiles and several birds are
housed in the Learning Center at the Forever Wild Sanctuary in Phelan.

The sanctuary was featured in a recent Extreme Makeover: Home Edition show
on ABC.

The sanctuary owners were given a new home and the Learning Center was
built from the ground up.

_Story continues below_
(http://abclocal.go.com/kabc/story?section=news/local/inland_empire&id=6800144&p\
t=print#bodyText
)

--
For the cats,

Carole Baskin, CEO of Big Cat Rescue
an Educational Sanctuary home
to more than 100 big cats
12802 Easy Street Tampa, FL  33625
813.493.4564 fax 885.4457

http://www.BigCatRescue.org


Sign our petition to protect tigers from being farmed here:

http://capwiz.com/bigcatrescue/issues/alert/?alertid=9952801&type=CU

Free ways to join us and help the big cats:

Twitter:  Follow Me and be invited to enter our Animal Lover's Dream Vacation Giveaway!  http://twitter.com/BigCatRescue

This message contains information from Big Cat Rescue that may be confidential or privileged. The information contained herein is intended
only for the eyes of the individual or entity named above.  You are hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution, disclosure, and/or copying of the information contained in this communication is strictly prohibited. The recipient should check this e-mail and any attachments for the presence of viruses. Big Cat Rescue accepts no liability for any damage or loss caused by any virus transmitted by this e-mail.




Deadly Cargo: Order Almost Any Exotic Online

Posted: May 7, 2009 12:23 PM PDT
Updated: May 7, 2009 12:55 PM PDT
By Trey Paul

MYRTLE BEACH, SC (WMBF) - There is no law in South Carolina that makes it
illegal for you to own any type of exotic animal, but how easy is it to get
a deadly snake shipped right to you?

WMBF News decided to find out. We had one of the world's deadliest snakes
shipped into the Myrtle Beach International Airport.

For about half a day, WMBF News Anchor Trey Paul actually owned one of the
world's most venomous snakes: a gaboon viper. They have the largest fangs
of any snake and some of the most venom.

All we had to do was go online. We found a website that gave us access to
dozens of venomous snakes that were for sale around the world.

We picked a snake, agreed on a price of $120, gave a credit card, and that
was it. No one asked an age or about experience.

We had our snake delivered to the Myrtle Beach International Airport and we
went inside with hidden cameras to pick it up.

We were told it would be shipped on a Delta Cargo plane, but after talking
with one of the clerks at the counter, we learned our snake, which was
packaged in a box, was actually shipped on a passenger plane inside of a cargo
area.

"He's all the way in the back, but if a bag were to come down and bust it
open or something like that, and it gets out, then what?" asked the Delta
clerk.

We didn't want to open our snake in a box on our own, so we met with a
local snake expert to help us out.

"A gaboon can kill a person and is potentially fatal," said Ken Alfieri.
"[It's] way more dangerous than our copperheads or cottonmouths. It's not an
animal you want to get bit by and end up in the hospital with."
Alfieri is a herpetologist and is trained to handle these types of snakes.
We asked him what he thought about how easy it was for us to get this
snake.

"I'm sad they didn't ask your age," he commented. "That should be a
requirement. Most people know what they're getting into and know what they're
dealing with. It's certainly not for the beginner or novice. You hope it
doesn't end up in the wrong hands."

According to a study done by researchers at the University of Florida,
there are 7,000 venomous snake bites per year in the United States, 15 of which
are fatal.

"If you look across the United States, nobody's ever been hurt by somebody
else's venomous snake," Alfieri noted. "It's never happened in the keeping
of the whole trade."

We found a 911 call from an Ohio man who was found dead after his "pet" boa
constrictor wrapped around his head, and another case in 2002 in South
Carolina when an 8-year old boy was bitten on the leg by his father's "pet"
tiger. In Myrtle Beach, a man was cited for keeping a hyena in his backyard
inside of a chain linked fence.

Dr. Jarratt Lark, an ER physician with the Grand Strand Regional Medical
Center, told us that the third ever reported case of a king cobra bite also
happened in Myrtle Beach.

Lark didn't treat that patient, but he did tell us that treating a venomous
snake bite is not easy, especially if it's from another country, like the
West African gaboon viper we purchased.

"It's kind of a chain of communication where I'd have to go down through
this chain of communication, identify the venom needed, find out where the
venom was, and then arrange to have the venom transferred here," Lark
explained.

The federal government leaves it up to individual states and cities to
decide if you can buy and keep an exotic animal. South Carolina law says you
can.
"Conceivably, you could probably get a lion shipped here," says State Rep.
Thad Viers (R-Horry County).

We showed Viers what we did and he called it "disturbing."

A Senate bill was introduced that would ban exotic animals, but we're told
since the committee chair wasn't briefed on it, it was killed.

"Without going into the merits of why, it just seemed like it was a
superficial reason why the bill did not move forward," Viers said.

South Carolina is one of nine states where you can do what we did, and our
investigation proves it can happen.

Since the issue doesn't seem to be getting anywhere inside the Statehouse,
Viers says he's taking a different approach. He says since the State of
South Carolina gives the Department of Natural Resources the authority to
regulate these types of animals, he's talking with officials about requiring
training or age certification.

He says this way is a lot quicker.


http://www.live5news.com/Global/story.asp?S=10322811

Reminds me of the 9 year old boy who used his mother's credit card and had a tiger shipped to his door.  That was in the late 1990's, I think.

--
For the cats,

Carole Baskin, CEO of Big Cat Rescue
an Educational Sanctuary home
to more than 100 big cats
12802 Easy Street Tampa, FL  33625
813.493.4564 fax 885.4457

http://www.BigCatRescue.org


Sign our petition to protect tigers from being farmed here:

http://capwiz.com/bigcatrescue/issues/alert/?alertid=9952801&type=CU

Free ways to join us and help the big cats:

Twitter:  Follow Me and be invited to enter our Animal Lover's Dream Vacation Giveaway!  http://twitter.com/BigCatRescue

This message contains information from Big Cat Rescue that may be confidential or privileged. The information contained herein is intended
only for the eyes of the individual or entity named above.  You are hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution, disclosure, and/or copying of the information contained in this communication is strictly prohibited. The recipient should check this e-mail and any attachments for the presence of viruses. Big Cat Rescue accepts no liability for any damage or loss caused by any virus transmitted by this e-mail.




You Can't Even Talk About It 20/20 of Farming Tigers to Eat Them

Please see below, regarding the tiger-farming promotion on ABC's 20/20.  Please post comments at:
http://abcnews.go.com/2020/AmazingAnimals/comments?type=story&id=7529068
 
 
Ban on Wild Tiger Sales 'a Complete Failure'?
John Stossel Says Killing Endangered Species Would Protect Them

By JOHN STOSSEL and JEFF DIAMOND
May 8, 2009

Tigers may be going extinct. There were once 100,000 of the grand animals, but today just a few thousand survive.

How do we save them and other endangered species? Well, here's an idea: Let's eat them!

Wild tigers are disappearing because poachers kill them for their skins and to get crushed tiger bone, which is made into paste that some people use as a painkiller.

Actor Harrison Ford does public service announcements supporting the international ban on the sale of exotic animal products.

"When the buying stops, the killing can too," he says in the PSA. "Case closed!"

But the case isn't closed, because outlawing buying and selling hasn't worked. The international ban has been in effect for 33 years, but the population of wild tigers has continued to shrink.

Watch John Stossel's special "You Can't Even Talk About It" tonight on "20/20" at 10 p.m. ET

Grace Gabriel, Asia regional director for the International Fund for Animal Welfare, says what's needed to save the tigers is better law enforcement.

"There needs to be judicial systems in place so that there will be punishments for wildlife crimes [that are] strong enough to have a deterrence power." But Terry Anderson from PERC, the Property and Environment Resource Center, disagrees.

"If we continue the current approach of no killing, no trading, I think the tiger is doomed," he said.

He believes governments have repeatedly failed when they tried to save animals by banning their sale.

PERC suggests the opposite: let people own wild animals, farm them and sell them.

That's what saved another species. High in the mountains of Montana, Pam and Craig Knowles raise bison.

Millions of these animals once roamed America, but 100 years ago they were almost extinct. Why? Because no one owned them. No ranchers like the Knowles had the incentive to protect them, and people killed them and sold their hides.

"There were a few trappers who saw what was going on and said, this is wrong," said Pam Knowles. "Here's an animal that could provide the whole country with meat."

So people began to fence bison in and eat them. Now America has half a million bison -- that's a way to save animals.

Does America have a shortage of chickens? No. Because we eat them. Do we have a shortage of minks? No. Because people have a reason to
protect them.

The Debate Over Farming Endangered Animals

In Africa, rhinos were disappearing because poachers killed them for their horns. African governments banned poaching, but this did little good.

"We're talking about countries, governments and police forces that are often involved in the poaching," said Anderson.

Some government game wardens took bribes, or slept on the job.

"It was a complete failure," said Dr. Brian Child, associate professor of African studies at the University of Florida, who spent years in Africa trying to save rhinos. "Wildlife was disappearing everywhere."

What finally worked, he said, was letting landowners own them and make money off tourism. Suddenly each tribe had skin in the game, and an incentive to protect its own rhinos. Those indifferent security guards became fierce protectors of their tribal rhinos. Anderson asked one what happened if he caught a poacher.

"He said, 'We don't kill them, we just beat them up badly enough, they go back to their village, and don't ever come back,'" Anderson said. "These people don't tolerate poaching because they want to keep the animals alive. They allow hunting. They allow photography. That is the way to save wildlife."

And it's worked.

But Judy Mills, Conservation International's wildlife trade advisor says that farming tigers won't necessarily stop poaching.

"Bears are farmed in China. There is more than enough bear bile to go around to the whole of China. [But] wild bears are still being poached for their gall bladders."

And this is true. It's impossible to stop all poaching. Rhinos too are still being poached. But their numbers have steadily grown since farming began in Africa.

"There are a lot more rhinos alive on private land where there were no rhinos 50 years ago, 40 years ago," said Child.

Right now in China, thousands of tigers survive only because some tiger farms protect them. About a dozen farms are currently breeding tigers, and their owners hope that next year the Chinese government will lift its ban on tiger sales.

Gabriel believes that would be a disaster for wild tigers. She says it's expensive to raise farmed tigers, and legalizing the sale of tiger parts would just increase poaching.

"If you allow farmed tigers to be traded on the market, you're going to restimulate demand," she said. "You're going to undermine over a decade of conservation work to reduce demand."

But Anderson says "that's a silly idea."

"It ignores what supply and demand is all about," he said. "Legalizing trade is not going to increase the demand. Farming is a way to take the pressu
re off of those wild tigers."

Farming Animals to Save Them: 'Magical Thinking'

So who's right?

"Let me tell you about a survey that we did recently in China, which showed that 90 percent of Chinese people actually support the ban," said Mills. "They support the ban, and they see the greater good in keeping the ban in place."

But many of the same people who supported the ban also admitted to having products made from tiger bone.

Gabriel says we need more time to educate the Chinese consumer, that "we haven't had a lot of time to work at all the steps" to reduce the demand in China for tiger products.

But how long can we wait? Mills claims the ban has worked in America, where it's illegal now even to sell medicines that pretend to contain tiger parts. But even in relatively law-abiding America, we easily found these products in New York City's Chinatown neighborhood that used images of tigers to promote sales.

Nonetheless, Mills says, "The bans have worked tremendously. By my calculations, more than 2,000 tigers are still alive in the wild today because of the ban."

But thousands more have vanished because people aren't allowed to own and sell tigers. It's quite the conceit that a few conservation groups think a government decree can get a billion-plus people to just change their culture.

"The demand is there by people for thousands of years who have felt that this is a useful medicinal product for them," said Anderson. "That isn't going away."

So it makes sense that farming tigers will meet that demand. But Judy Mills disagrees.

"Believing that farming tigers and reopening trade in their products will somehow save wild tigers is magical thinking," she said.

Magical thinking? No. Anderson says farming has already worked with elephants in Botswana, rhinos in southern Africa, and the bison in America. He believes it will work again with tigers in China.

"If we make animals a marketable product," said Anderson, "they will be saved. "

Copyright © 2009 ABC News Internet Ventures


--
For the cats,

Carole Baskin, CEO of Big Cat Rescue
an Educational Sanctuary home
to more than 100 big cats
12802 Easy Street Tampa, FL  33625
813.493.4564 fax 885.4457

http://www.BigCatRescue.org


Sign our petition to protect tigers from being farmed here:

http://capwiz.com/bigcatrescue/issues/alert/?alertid=9952801&type=CU

Free ways to join us and help the big cats:

Twitter:  Follow Me and be invited to enter our Animal Lover's Dream Vacation Giveaway!  http://twitter.com/BigCatRescue

This message contains information from Big Cat Rescue that may be confidential or privileged. The information contained herein is intended
only for the eyes of the individual or entity named above.  You are hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution, disclosure, and/or copying of the information contained in this communication is strictly prohibited. The recipient should check this e-mail and any attachments for the presence of viruses. Big Cat Rescue accepts no liability for any damage or loss caused by any virus transmitted by this e-mail.




The Facts of Tiger Farming from ITC

The Facts of Tiger Farming

Tiger farming is a threat to safety of wild tigers.  Otherwise, tiger farming will make the king of the jungle − and the jungle − disappear forever.

Bans on tiger trade have nearly stopped the killing of wild tigers for their skins and bones.  Improving enforcement and public awareness of these bans can end tiger trade once and for all, allowing tigers to thrive in the wild.

When we save wild tigers, we save the rich forests in which they live, with all of their climate-cooling trees, fresh water, herbal medicines and all the other irreplaceable resources needed for a healthy human society and a healthy planet.

We will save wild tigers, if we stop trade in tiger parts and products from all sources, including tiger farms.

FACT: Tiger trade bans work.   
•    China’s 16-year tiger trade ban has been an overwhelming success in reducing trade and demand.
•    Bans on tiger trade have helped Russia’s tiger population recover and other wild tiger populations to persist.
•    Trade bans will only work if they are enforced and backed up with demand reduction campaigns.

FACT:  Tiger conservation works.
•    Traditional tiger conservation methods work when they have adequate political and financial support.
•    Protection of tigers and their habitat and prey do stabilize wild tiger populations.
•    Protecting wild tigers protects large tracts of the world’s most valuable natural resources.

FACT:  Legalizing tiger farming will increase killing of wild tigers.
•    Legalizing trade in farmed tiger products will expand opportunities to sell parts and products from wild tigers.
•    Illegal tiger trade is run by organized criminal networks, which will exploit loopholes opened by legalizing trade.
•    Organized criminal networks will not give up illegal tiger trade just because farmed tiger products are available. Poaching tiger brings big gains to criminals with little risk.

FACT:  Tiger products are not needed for human health.
•    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) gave up the use to tiger products 16 years ago.
•    Leaders of the TCM community say they no longer need or want tiger bone, and China’s TCM agency has changed the official TCM pharmacopeia to remove tiger bone as a legitimate treatment.
•    Alternatives to tiger bone are effective, plentiful, sustainable and embraced by TCM practitioners.

FACT:  Legalizing tiger farming will stimulate demand for wild tiger parts & products.
•    Tiger farming will reignite demand for tiger products among China’s 1.3 billion consumers.
•    Since wild tiger bone is believed to be more effective, demand for the bones of wild tigers will go up, too.
•    Rekindling China’s appetite for tiger products could quickly wipe out wild tiger populations.

FACT:  Wild tigers can come back in the wild.
•    Wild tigers breed like cats.
•    Wild tigers can come back quickly when they have enough habitat, prey and protection from poachers.
•    Wild tigers do not need outside help when they have plenty of food and shelter.



FACT:  People benefit when tigers come back in the wild.
•    Local people benefit economically when tiger are present and tourists can see wild tigers
•    Protecting tigers and their habitats protect air, water and other forest resources that sustain the lives and livelihoods of millions of people.

FACT:  Stopping tiger trade is a global issue.
•    An international treaty signed by 174 countries prohibits international trade in tiger parts and products and discourages tiger farming.
•    Countries with the largest wild tiger populations stand to lose the most if tiger farming is legalized. 
•    Any country that allows tiger farming and trade will bear responsibility for the loss of wild tigers.

 
 
END TIGER TRADE

Facts by International Tiger Coalition 


--
For the cats,

Carole Baskin, CEO of Big Cat Rescue
an Educational Sanctuary home
to more than 100 big cats
12802 Easy Street Tampa, FL  33625
813.493.4564 fax 885.4457

http://www.BigCatRescue.org


Sign our petition to protect tigers from being farmed here:

http://capwiz.com/bigcatrescue/issues/alert/?alertid=9952801&type=CU

Free ways to join us and help the big cats:

Twitter:  Follow Me and be invited to enter our Animal Lover's Dream Vacation Giveaway!  http://twitter.com/BigCatRescue

This message contains information from Big Cat Rescue that may be confidential or privileged. The information contained herein is intended
only for the eyes of the individual or entity named above.  You are hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution, disclosure, and/or copying of the information contained in this communication is strictly prohibited. The recipient should check this e-mail and any attachments for the presence of viruses. Big Cat Rescue accepts no liability for any damage or loss caused by any virus transmitted by this e-mail.




Tiger Farms: A TICKET TO EXTINCTION

International Tiger Coalition: Statement



Tiger Farms: A TICKET TO EXTINCTION

ABC's 20/20 promotes flawed economics and false conservation value, says International Tiger Coalition


Washington DC – The International Tiger Coalition (ITC), an international group of organizations committed to ending tiger trade, rejects the false and deeply flawed argument that tigers bred on industrialized farms can save wild tigers as presented on ABC's 20/20 tonight.


Tiger farms were established and are managed primarily for commercial trade, not conservation, driven by profit from the sales of tiger-bone wine and skins. At present, all commercial trade in tigers and their products is illegal. But as long as there are tiger farms that promise a future reopening of tiger trade, the ban cannot be effective.


Since initiating a domestic ban on tiger trade in 1993, the Chinese government has removed tiger bone as an ingredient in the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) pharmacopeia and invested in the development of effective alternative medicines and public awareness campaigns. It has been very effective in protecting wild tigers by stopping the previously legal market, reducing demand and allowing some fragile tiger populations to stabilize, such as the Siberian tiger in the Russian Far East.


A contingent of business owners with financial interest in large-scale tiger farms and their supporters are now pushing China to rescind the ban. Permitting even a limited trade in farmed tigers within China will undermine decades of conservation efforts across the range of the tiger by reigniting a market demand that has nearly been extinguished and increase poaching of wild tigers.


Poaching will always be too cost-competitive an option to ignore: consider the price of a bullet, trap or poison to kill a wild tiger against an estimated US$4,000 to US$10,000 to raise a farmed tiger to maturity. Wild-sourced products are also consistently perceived to be superior by consumers, a situation that has resulted in wild Asiatic black bears being poached despite the saturation of the Chinese market with bear bile from farmed bears.


Finally, the notion that tigers bred on a farm can be reintroduced to the wild, thus contributing to the survival of wild populations, has no factual basis. Farmed tigers are likely to be too genetically and behaviorally compromised to be released into the wild.


Farming tigers for trade will only hasten the irreplaceable loss of a species on the brink. With improved enforcement, existing bans can wipe out tiger trade before tiger trade wipes out wild tigers.


###


QUOTES:

"It is inconceivable that profit and the bottom line was the only lens through which 20/20 approached the issue of tiger farming," said Grace Gabriel, Asia Regional Director of IFAW and ITC member, who was interviewed by the show. "Every player in that trade chain is criminally responsible for the depletion of tigers in the wild, from poachers to smugglers to traders and to those who promote tiger trade: investors and owners of tiger farms."


"Unfortunately, 20/20 focused on sensational and unproven free-market theories applied to tiger farming instead of presenting a balanced report on the inherent risks to the tiger's very survival in the wild," said Judy Mills of Conservation International and Moderator of the ITC, who was interviewed on the show. "All our science and studies indicate that opening tiger trade and encouraging tiger farms is bad news for wild tigers and by extension, for people and the planet."


Note to editors:

B-roll (TRT: 2.06, NATSOT): http://www.divshare.com/download/7307598-cf7

High-resolution images: http://www.savethetigerfund.org/Content/NavigationMenu2/News/MediaKits/TigerFarmMediaKit/default.htm


  • The population of wild tigers has plummeted from 100,000 a century ago to around 4,000 today. China, the country where the tiger species is believed to have originated, has fewer than 25 tigers left in the wild along its borders with Russia and Laos. China's population of tigers on its border with Russia could recover—as long as trade remains closed within China.

  • Tigers are vital to the health of ecosystems. The loss of these flagship species impacts biodiversity, deprives nations of rightful revenue from tourism and agriculture, and puts food security and the health of people at risk.

  • Tigers are listed on Appendix I of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), which bans the international trade of tigers, their parts and derivatives, for commercial purposes. In 2007, the 171 CITES member governments decided by consensus that tigers should not be bred in farms for their parts and products—because they agreed tiger farming threatens the survival of wild tigers.

  • A 2007 poll in China by Save the Tiger Fund found that 90 percent of Chinese people favor keeping the tiger trade ban in place for the sake of wild tigers and China's international image. Legitimate Traditional Chinese Medicine practitioners have also moved away from using tiger bone in medicine.

  • A 2007 survey by TRAFFIC (the wildlife trade programme of WWF and IUCN) of over 500 retail TCM shops in China showed that hardly any shops stock tiger bone as medicine. Of 518 shops, only 2.5 percent claim availability of tiger bone and 64 percent are aware of the trade ban. Today, TCM colleges no longer teach the use of tiger bone as medicine, and legitimate, law-abiding practitioners around the world no longer use tiger bone.



For more information:

International Tiger Coalition: Trishna GURUNG, WWF E: trishna.gurung@wwfus.org T: 202-203-8863

Conservation International: Judy Mills E: j.mills@conservation.org T: 202-674-4588

International Fund for Animal Welfare: Grace Gabriel E: ggabriel@ifaw.org T: 508-496-4471



--
For the cats,

Carole Baskin, CEO of Big Cat Rescue
an Educational Sanctuary home
to more than 100 big cats
12802 Easy Street Tampa, FL  33625
813.493.4564 fax 885.4457

http://www.BigCatRescue.org


Sign our petition to protect tigers from being farmed here:

http://capwiz.com/bigcatrescue/issues/alert/?alertid=9952801&type=CU

Free ways to join us and help the big cats:

Twitter:  Follow Me and be invited to enter our Animal Lover's Dream Vacation Giveaway!  http://twitter.com/BigCatRescue

This message contains information from Big Cat Rescue that may be confidential or privileged. The information contained herein is intended
only for the eyes of the individual or entity named above.  You are hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution, disclosure, and/or copying of the information contained in this communication is strictly prohibited. The recipient should check this e-mail and any attachments for the presence of viruses. Big Cat Rescue accepts no liability for any damage or loss caused by any virus transmitted by this e-mail.




Thursday, May 07, 2009

Tell 20/20 That You Oppose the Farming of Tigers

Tell 20/20 That You Oppose the Farming of Tigers

Their contact form is here:  http://abcnews.go.com/Site/page?id=3271346&cat=20/20

Activists Fight Over How to Save Tigers
http://abcnews.go.com/Video/playerIndex?id=7531536

[Elizabeth Vargas] Hello, I'm Elizabeth Vargas and welcome to 20/20 In Touch.
We breed cows and pigs and chickens to satisfy our appetite for food so why not breed endangered species to satisfy poachers' needs? It's a radical proposal and as John Stossel reports Friday, you can't even talk about it.
 
[John STOSSEL] Wild tigers are disappearing. There were once a hundred thousand of these grand animals. Today, just a few thousand survive.  They are disappearing because poachers kill them for their skins and mostly they get crushed tiger bone, which is made is made into a paste, which is supposed to kill pain.
 
[Harrison Ford] We have a situation here...

[John STOSSEL] Harrison Ford's public service announcement that support the ban of exotic animal product.
 
[Harrison Ford]when the buying stops, the killing can too. Case closed.
 
[John STOSSEL] But the case isn't closed but the ban hasn't worked. It's been in effect 33 years but the population of wild tigers has continued to shrink. This tiger is in New York's Bronx Zoo.
 
[Grace Gabriel] There needs to be judicial systems in place so there will be punishment for wildlife crimes that is strong enough to have deterrence power.
 
[Terry Andersen] If continue the current approach of no killing, no trading, I think the tiger is doomed.
 
[John STOSSEL] Terry Andersen of PERC, the Property and Environmental Resource Centre points out that governments have repeatedly failed when they try to save animals by banning their sale. PERC says the opposite. Let people own wild animals, farm them, and sell them.


--
For the cats,

Carole Baskin, CEO of Big Cat Rescue
an Educational Sanctuary home
to more than 100 big cats
12802 Easy Street Tampa, FL  33625
813.493.4564 fax 885.4457

http://www.BigCatRescue.org


Sign our petition to protect tigers from being farmed here:

http://capwiz.com/bigcatrescue/issues/alert/?alertid=9952801&type=CU

Free ways to join us and help the big cats:

Twitter:  Follow Me and be invited to enter our Animal Lover's Dream Vacation Giveaway!  http://twitter.com/BigCatRescue

This message contains information from Big Cat Rescue that may be confidential or privileged. The information contained herein is intended
only for the eyes of the individual or entity named above.  You are hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution, disclosure, and/or copying of the information contained in this communication is strictly prohibited. The recipient should check this e-mail and any attachments for the presence of viruses. Big Cat Rescue accepts no liability for any damage or loss caused by any virus transmitted by this e-mail.




Big Cat Summer Camp in Tribune

Tampa summer camp registration

By Jared Leone, Times Staff Writer
In Print: Friday, May 8, 2009



School's out for summer. Well almost. And you still haven't decided what to do with the kids while you're at work? From athletic to academic, from cooking to swimming, somewhere around town a camp is waiting for your child. Here are just a few:

Terrace Community Middle School: Summer SLAM (Summer Learning and More) features 17 different programs including Lego Mania, digital photography, volleyball, basketball, archaeological digging, vegetarian cooking and more.

When: Half-day camps from 8 a.m. to noon or from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m.; full-day from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Cost: $15 one-time registration fee, and programs are $65 each week.

Contact: (813) 987-6555; 11734 Jefferson Road; tcmstornadoes.com.

Tampa Chess Club: Learn chess tips and tricks. A camp for all levels from beginners to tournament skill.

When: 9 a.m. to noon or 1 to 4 p.m. or all day June 15 to 17, June 29 to July 1 and July 13 to 15.

Cost: Half-day camp is $30 for chess club members and $40 for nonmembers; all-day is $50 for members, $70 for nonmembers.

Contact: (813) 727-8852; 10936 N 56th St., Temple Terrace.

Hillsborough County Summer Fun Camp: The Summer Fun Camp is for ages 6 and older and takes place at 43 playground and recreation centers locations throughout the county.

When: 6:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. June 8 through Aug. 14.

Cost: $300, discounts are available based on income.

Contact: (813) 635-3500; visit hillsboroughcounty.org/parks.

Hillsborough County Traveling Teen Camp: Six one-week camps take kids ages 12 to 17 to area attractions like Wet-n-Wild, Universal Studios, and the Museum of Science and Industry.

When: Camps start June 8.

Cost: $90 to $123, depending on field trips.

Contact: (813) 635-3500; visit hillsboroughcounty.org/parks.

Carrollwood Cultural Center: Children ages 2 to 14 can check out the 22 half-day camps in four focus areas, including movement and performance, music, art, and construction and engineering.

When: June 8 to July 17.

Cost: $90 for members and $100 for nonmembers each week; $180 for full-day camp for members and $200 for nonmembers each week.

Contact: (813) 269-1310; 4537 Lowell Road; carrollwoodcenter.org.

Big Cat Rescue: Children ages 8 to 15 can discover the outdoors with more than 100 big cats at the 45-acre Citrus Park facility.

When: 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. starting June 15.

Cost: Early bird registration through May 29 is $175. The cost is $190 for each four-day session.

Contact: (813) 920-4130; 12802 Easy St.; bigcatrescue.org.

Independent Day School: Children from grades pre-K3 to 8 can participate in more than 60 full- and half-day camps including sports, academics, recreation and field trips.

When: 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.; extended care is available starting at 7:15 a.m. and from 3 to 6 p.m. starting June 15.

Cost: From $90 depending on the camp.

Contact: (813) 961-3087; 12015 Orange Grove Drive; idsyes.com/summer-camps.htm.

Wharton Wildcats soccer camp: Learn technical and tactical tips to step up your soccer game. Camp is for students entering grades 3 to 12.

When: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. starting June 8.

Cost: $100 each session.

Contact: (813) 340-5285; whartonsoccer@verizon.net.

Rocket Science Summer Camp: Students in grades 5 to 8 can learn all aspects of model rocketry including design, building and safe launch. Completion of this camp qualifies scouts for the Space Exploration Badge.

When: 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. June 8 to 25 at Gaither High School, 16200 N Dale Mabry Highway.

Cost: $237 for 12-day session. Register by May 29.

Contact: (813) 975-4818, ext. 449; or e-mail david.maag@sdhc.k12.fl.us.

YMCA Summer Day Camps: This program is for kids age 6 and up. Speciality camps are available for preschool ages 3 to 5 and teens 13 to 17.

When: Full day from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. June 8 to Aug. 21.

Cost: $120 to $200 each week; there is a 10 percent off second child discount.

Contact: Check your neighborhood YMCA for more information or go to tampaymca.org.

Compiled by Jared Leone, Times Staff Writer

http://www.tampabay.com/news/briefs/article998500.ece

--
For the cats,

Carole Baskin, CEO of Big Cat Rescue
an Educational Sanctuary home
to more than 100 big cats
12802 Easy Street Tampa, FL  33625
813.493.4564 fax 885.4457

http://www.BigCatRescue.org


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